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Bayern Munich CEO Oliver Kahn discusses hurdles with squad planning and budget

Player salaries are becoming an issue to Oliver Kahn.

FC Bayern Muenchen Celebrates Winning The Bundesliga Photo by Thomas Hiermayer/vi/DeFodi Images via Getty Images

Bayern Munich CEO Oliver Kahn thinks players salaries are becoming an issue.

“The problem is salaries, which have risen steadily in recent years and are unlikely to go down. Everyone is struggling with that. We lost out on 150 to 200 million euros due to the pandemic,” Kahn told Welt am Sonntag (as captured by @iMiaSanMia). “For me, sporting success is the top priority but without endangering economic stability. In the future, it will be important to carefully weigh up which risks the club can take in order not to let the gap to the other top European clubs grow.”

During the winter, rumors were swirling that Bayern Munich would shift into a “selling” club that developed players, raised their values, and then sold them.

“Bayern is not and will not become a development club. FC Bayern is still a big force. There are many players who are dying to play for us. A development club is forced to sell players every now and then. That’s not us,” Kahn said. “We want to keep our top players for as long as possible. That’s why we extended with (Joshua) Kimmich, (Leon) Goretzka, (Kingsley) Coman and (Thomas) Müller this season. Jamal Musiala is also a cornerstone for the future.”

When looking for new players, Kahn has an established profile for what he wants.

“Character is very important for me. Mentality, the ability to win in all conditions is a decisive factor. The players have to deal with the entitlement to win every single game. Not everyone can do that” “We need players who know what it means to put the Bayern badge on their chests. Finding such players is getting difficult. We don’t need players who see the club as a ‘platform’ to spend a short time and then leave.”

Kahn, though, has also heard the criticism that his organization has not been as quick to address contracts for players on the squad.

Hoeneß and Rummenigge would have acted quicker and more decisive regarding Lewandowski and other contracts..

“I cannot say how Uli or Karl-Heinz would have acted. When I started here, I was aware that the bar was set very high and that there would be situations in which the past would always be mentioned. Every situation is different and I act as I see right,” Kahn said. “I’m totally convinced that we are going on the right path into the future. Of course, there are always some problems here and there, but that’s part of it, but when I hear or read from other clubs, ‘Now we have a chance against Bayern’ — I can only say: ‘We’ll talk again at the end of next season.’”