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Bayern Munich board member Uli Hoeness says he could imagine working as a consultant for the DFB

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Hoeness could be well suited for a role with the DFB at a certain capacity.

FC Bayern Munich v Valencia Basket - Turkish Airlines EuroLeague Photo by Christina Pahnke/Euroleague Basketball via Getty Images

The name Uli Hoeness is completely synonymous with Bayern Munich.

In November of 2019, he stepped down from his post as the club’s president after 40 years of service and was replaced by Herbert Hainer. He still serves on the club’s supervisory board and can weigh in on certain decisions the club makes, but other than that he’s just done some punditry work on the side, albeit short-lived.

During a recent appearance on “Night of Legends” for RTL at the German football museum in Dortmund, Hoeness revealed that he would be open to potentially accepting a role with the DFB at some capacity (Abendzeitung). “If you need us as advisors, that would be a new situation. But first the DFB have to say what they want and then we’ll see,” he said when he was asked about the subject.

There have been calls amongst the German footballing community for both Hoeness and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge to step into front office roles for Die Mannschaft as many feel their successes at Bayern would translate into similar successes for the national team. In the future, there would also be the tremendous rapport with Hansi Flick, who is taking over for Joachim Low after this summer’s European Championships.

Despite the backing he would receive, Hoeness feels that the next DFB president should be someone he described as “young and dynamic,” all but taking himself out of the equation. Berti Vogts had said “Uli knows exactly how a president has to act.” On paper, the idea of him taking over as president looks very nice, but with what he said and what his views are, it’s highly unlikely to transpire. At most, Hoeness only feels ready to serve as a sort of advisor or consultant to the DFB, much like his role on Bayern’s board. He could weigh in on the decision making without having too much involvement or stepping on any toes, so to speak.