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Robert Lewandowski admits he’s not thinking about Gerd Muller’s total Bundesliga goals record

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The single season scoring record might’ve been the only record Lewy could break.

FBL-GER-BUNDESLIGA-BAYERN MUNICH-AUGSBURG Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Robert Lewandowski broke Gerd Muller’s single season, Bundesliga scoring record with his 41st tally of the season with the last kick of the football in Bayern Munich’s 5-2 win over FC Augsburg on the last match day of the season. Fiction writers could not have written a more dramatic script for Lewandowski finally breaking Muller’s long standing record, especially after he’d missed four weeks earlier on in the Ruckrunde due to a knee injury sustained on international duty with Poland.

Despite breaking Gerd’s single season record, Lewandowski admits that he’s not thinking about Muller’s total Bundesliga goals record at the moment (Az). He tallied a total of 365 goals during his playing days in the Bundesliga, and Lewandowski is currently second on the list with 277 goals after surpassing Klaus Fischer earlier on this season. “I haven’t thought about the 365 goals by Gerd Müller. This record is so far away and not in my head yet,” Bayern’s number 9 admitted.

Lewandowski needs to score 88 goals to equal Muller’s mark of 365 goals, so with his current production rate, he could very well do so in three seasons. He scored 41 goals this season, 34 goals last season, 22 goals in the 2018/2019 season and 29 goals in the 2017/2018 season. Based on that form, he would eventually break Muller’s record at some point during one of the next two or three seasons.

Of course, Lewandowski’s total Bundesliga tally includes his tenure at Borussia Dortmund, where he spent four seasons before moving to Bayern on a free transfer. Looking back on his time with Die Schwarzgelben, he admitted that it was a difficult adjust to move to Germany and that it took him a while to find his footing. “The first ten months in Germany were difficult — to live here and to get used to. I had to do a lot of things by myself, which took a lot of energy. The then 21-year-old boy and the soon 33-year-old boy — it’s a completely different world,” he explained.

Borussia Dortmund - Training Session Photo by Alex Grimm/Bongarts/Getty Images