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Joachim Löw speaks on tough decision to step down from Germany post

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The 2014 World Cup winner admitted it was a tough decision to walk away.

DFB Press Conference Photo by Thomas Böcker-DFB/Handout via Getty Images

Joachim Löw spent a good part of the pandemic-induced quarantine pondering his own future and for the 61-year-old, the timing to move on from his role as manager for Germany now feels right.

“I have had a lot of time to think during the past year in the pandemic, regardless of the Spain match. I decided to think hard about my future. Where are we standing? What do I want? For me personally this summer is the right moment to pass the baton to another coach,” Löw said (as captured by DFB.de). “The change that we have introduced is absolutely the right move. I know that our players still lack experience, but I know that they have unbelievable potential and quality. I am absolutely convinced that the young generation of players will reach their full potential in perhaps 2024 with the tournament in our own country. I was at the 2006 World Cup. What we experienced there was enthusiasm from both the team and from society. It created memories. New journeys, new ways of thinking. That should be the case in 2024 again.”

Germany Training Session
Joachim Löw is entering his final months as Germany’s manager.
Photo by Fran Santiago/Getty Images

Löw thinks 2024 is monumental chance for Germany to show off its rebuilding plan in front of its home fans.

“A tournament in your own country can generate so much. I don’t see myself in this position in 2024 anymore. The change should not hinder the team; a new coach has sufficient time now,” said Löw. “This opportunity should also be given to coaches and players. I came to acknowledge this and arranged a discussion with Oliver Bierhoff and later with my coaching team and the DFB President. I also wanted to make the announcement before the upcoming international fixtures, so that we can focus fully on those.”

For Löw, his duties may be ending, but the DFB is just getting started in its hunt for a replacement.