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European Super League set to make a comeback with brand new guidelines

The ESL has reportedly scrapped its “permanent member” system as a part of including more teams in the competition.

Paris Saint-Germain v Real Madrid - UEFA Champions League, Group A Photo by Mehdi Taamallah/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The European Super League, which was introduced as a result of the collaboration between some of the continent’s elite football clubs, had a surprisingly short lifespan. The mega-rich powerhouses from England, Spain, and Italy formed an alliance back in April to have their clubs play in a league of their own.

Bundesliga giants Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund were quick to reject their invitations. Nasser Al-Khelaifi’s PSG later followed suit. The protests against the Super League spread like wildfire within the football community and the elites had no choice but to put their plans on hold for the time being.

It was fairly certain that the ESL would make a comeback, perhaps with better and more convincing ideas and guidelines. WirtschaftssWoche (via Sport1) has given us an overview of just that. But did they really make it better? Let’s take a look:

According to the German outlet, the new version of the Super League would not have permanent members as initially decided and will be an open competition just like the Champions League. The league will be divided into two divisions with 20 teams each as it opens the door for more clubs to participate.

As a part of making amends for the events in April, the members are reportedly planning to pay more attention to the fans and steer the boat in a way that would satisfy them – which would mean giving the fans grants to travel to away games and a reservation of 70 percent seats in the finale for supporters of the two competing sides.

The members are waiting for a verdict from the European Court of Justice and plan to start working on ESL 2.0 as soon as everything is cleared up.