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Two observations from Germany’s 3-3 draw with Switzerland

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The National team’s woes continue under Löw as they end another game in stalemate.

Germany v Switzerland - UEFA Nations League Photo by Martin Rose/Getty Images

While Ukraine was in the process of a shock win against Spain, Joachim Löw’s Germany took on Vladimir Petković’s Switzerland in the UEFA Nations League. With a total of 6 goals scored, it was a goal fest that ultimately ended in a tie. This result comes as Germany’s third draw in four games played in the Nations League. Here are the game observations:

A Superb Swiss side

Germany v Switzerland - UEFA Nations League Photo by Martin Rose/Getty Images

Vladimir Petković had the Swiss performing like army knives, often cutting through the fragile German defense and creating dangerous chances.

Their intense pressing proved to be successful as it lead to several give-aways by the Germans, helping the Swiss pile on pressure against a poor German defense. With 10 out of 16 tackles won, the Swiss constantly pressured and hassled their opposition who only managed to win 6 tackles out of 17 attempts.

The defensive work rate was equally matched by the offensive work rate. Succeeding in 7 out of 10 dribbles, the Swiss made good on their chances managing to hurt the Germans with far fewer but well-taken opportunities.

Overall, Petrović’s men were the better and more balanced side that could have done slightly better to hold on to their lead and seal the game with a win.

Individual quality continues to be the saving grace of Die Mannschaft

Germany v Switzerland - UEFA Nations League Photo by TF-Images/Getty Images

A similar story of a disorganized team that lacks cohesion continues to plague the German National team.

Joachim Löw’s grand plans for “developing” the national team are time and again falling short. His trade-offs to move on from “older” players who are much better than some of the current crop seem to have set the course for another disaster.

Rather than tactics, the sheer individual quality of players like Manuel Neuer, Toni Kroos, Joshua Kimmich, Serge Gnabry, Kai Havertz, and Leon Goretzka is what is preventing Germany from humiliations and thrashings against even decent oppositions.

Players such as Antonio Rüdiger, Julian Draxler, and Robin Gosens just aren’t good enough to start for the first team. The defense especially could improve drastically with the presence of experienced defenders like Jerome Boateng and Mats Hummels.

With the Euros arriving in 8 months, Jogi better get his act together and fast or it would not be a surprise if Die Mannschaft bids adios to this tournament too at the group stage.