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Tobias Schweinsteiger: a return to Bayern Munich is “not realistic”

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German coaching talent and Bayern Munich’s recently departed assistant U17 coach, Tobias Schweinsteiger, discussed his future plans and his brother’s career in an interview with Welt.

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HEIMSTETTEN, GERMANY - JUNE 07: Assistant coach Tobias Schweinsteiger walks off the pitch before the B Juniors German Championship Semi Final between Bayern Muenchen and FC Schalke 04 on June 7, 2017 in Heimstetten, Germany. Photo by Sebastian Widmann/Bongarts/Getty Images

In his first interview since his abrupt departure from Bayern Munich, Tobias Schweinsteiger spoke with Welt about what the future holds for him and his current engagements, and also shared some of his fondest memories from his brother Bastian’s career on the eve of his testimonial game at the Allianz Arena with the Chicago Fire.

Schweinsteiger was reluctant to discuss the circumstances of his departure from Bayern Munich, where he was effectively passed over as head coach of Bayern’s U17 for Miroslav Klose, despite his spotless credentials and three years of success with Bayern’s youth teams:

Ultimately I would not like to say much about it. It’s well-known and, in my eyes, something positive that I would like to develop and gladly assume responsibility in the long term.

A return to Bayern Munich, unfortunately, now looks very unlikely. Schweinsteiger commented,

I wouldn’t rule anything out in soccer, but at the moment it’s not realistic.

Immediately after word of his ouster spread, Schweinsteiger was encouraged by a wave of messages that reached him from the sports world:

Very many clubs and officials from soccer and other sports got in touch with me. I felt that a lot of people were following my progress very carefully and value my work; that makes me really happy.

Schweinsteiger has been participating in various coaching events, including a course on “The principles of offensive play” for the Austrian Football Association. He has not yet, however, found a new club, although he has no shortage of offers:

I had several offers, including some from abroad. There were a lot of attractive ones, but for me it’s important that everything fits. And so far that hasn’t been the case.

It may come as a surprise that Schweinsteiger is currently spending time with the coaching staff, not of a soccer team, but rather an ice hockey team: EHC Red Bull Munich. Schweinsteiger said,

For me, these are incredibly valuable insights. I’ve always tried to learn from other sports for my work in soccer and to look outside my own element. Coach Don Jackson was German champion in ice hockey six times; I can learn a lot from such a person. With EHC, I’m involved especially in talent development and individual player support, an area that I’m enormously interested in and which in my opinion is becoming ever more important in soccer.

Naturally enough, with his brother Bastian back in Munich for his testimonial game with the Chicago Fire, Tobias also shared some of his most vivid memories from his brother’s career. One in particular was not a happy one:

I’ll never forget how Basti broke his collarbone in 2012 in the Champions League against Napoli — right before the “Finale dahoam.” I was sitting in the stands just 20 meters away. A brutally shocking moment. And then of course Wembley 2013, the Champions League victory, the Triple. My brother had a fantastic career at Bayern.

Tobias also, finally, explained how he and his brother differ as players:

Basti is definitely better trained technically; I spent a lot of time skiing during phases in my youth. He picked up an enormous amount about tactics from his coaches, which I had to acquire more by working on my own. Our posture in running, shooting, and passing is very similar. A Schweinsteiger is a Schweinsteiger.