clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Sandro Wagner attracts reproval after throwing the consolation prize into the crowd

New, comments

Giving a gift to a fan or sore loser?

BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 19: Sandro Wagner of Muenchen walks of the podium after he received his medal during the DFB Cup final between Bayern Muenchen and Eintracht Frankfurt at Olympiastadion on May 19, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.
BERLIN, GERMANY - MAY 19: Sandro Wagner of Muenchen walks of the podium after he received his medal during the DFB Cup final between Bayern Muenchen and Eintracht Frankfurt at Olympiastadion on May 19, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.
(Photo by Maja Hitij/Bongarts/Getty Images)

Since his return from 1899 Hoffenheim, Sandro Wagner has had an amazing few months at Bayern Munich. He stole the hearts of Bayern fans around the world by his epic goal celebration of kissing the Bayern badge on his jersey. However, it seems like he had been waiting for the end of the season to kick-start some controversies. A few days back he initiated it by announcing his retirement from national football after being left out of Joachim Löw’s preliminary squad for the World Cup.

The second scandal began when, according to Abendzeitung, a frustrated Wagner threw away his medal after Saturday’s DFB Pokal defeat against Eintracht Frankfurt. Photos appeared, later that night, on Twitter of the supposed catcher holding Wagner’s medal. The caption said “So Wagner throws his medal into the crowd, I have it. What is its value?”

Uli Hoeness was unsure of whether the news is true but he told Sport Bild that he thinks what Wagner did was wrong:

I didn’t see that, but if he did that, that is not right.

Everybody was irked after the defeat; Jupp Heynckes and the boys left the arena without congratulating Frankfurt for their victory. Although everyone thinks that was disruptive, all eyes are on Wagner and no one is happy about what they saw.

Here’s a series of tweets from the guy who claims to have caught Wagner’s medal:

The question about the value was actually meant like this--what is it worth to Wagner? . . . for me myself its priceless, I hold it in honor, which is precisely what he couldn’t do!