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Zidane issues sprint ban for Ronaldo, Hoeneß makes controversial remark ahead of the Champions League clash

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Bayern Munich and Real Madrid have their own ways of staying fresh for the Champions League.

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - OCTOBER 31:  Karl-Heinz Rummenigge, CEO of Bayern Muenchen talks with Uli Hoeness, President of Bayern Muenchen, in the crowd during the UEFA Champions League group B match between Celtic FC and Bayern Muenchen at Celtic Park on October 31, 2017 in Glasgow, United Kingdom.  (Photo by Chris Brunskill Ltd/Getty Images) Photo by Chris Brunskill Ltd/Getty Images

Zidane formulates new scheme to strengthen Cristiano Ronaldo

Ahead of the much awaited Champions League clash between Bayern Munich and Real Madrid, interesting news has emerged from the Spanish capital. According to the Spanish news portal El Confidencial, Zinedine Zidane has conceived a new idea to strengthen his team and to increase their chances of getting the better of the Bavarians.

The boss has instructed Real Madrid’s star striker Cristiano Ronaldo not to sprint—at least not to sprint more than necessary. The report states that Zidane instructed the Portuguese international not to sprint more than 30 or 40 meters behind the ball to stay fresh so that he can use his skills during the entirety of the match. Now it is almost clear that he is completely relying on Ronaldo for the semifinals.

Uli Hoeneß draws criticism from fans with his Hannover remark

Since Real Madrid did not make it to the finals of the Copa del Rey, they had a whole week to prepare for the semifinals while Bayern Munich had a league match to concentrate on. That arguably leaves the Spaniards fresher and more prepared for the first leg of the semifinal tie.

But Madrid’s week off is not a big deal according to Bayern’s club president Uli Hoeneß, who made a controversial remark after the team’s league match against Hannover.

We’re going into the game with a break, too. Today was the break!

This open statement by the president has attracted a lot of criticism. Some people tagged it as arrogant and disrespectful towards Hannover and the whole Bundesliga. Bayern of course still had to show up and play on Saturday, but the pace of the game and Bayern’s overall dominance despite heavy rotation lends at least some credence to Hoenß's claim—although it is not entirely fair to Hannover.